Re-Thinking Music Teacher Education and Classical Music’s Identity Crisis

If every kid were the same, they would all enjoy the same genre of music. Of course, we know that every kid is not the same but if the first sentence seems like it's obvious then why isn't it obvious in music programs around North America? The problem, as I see it, lies in the … Continue reading Re-Thinking Music Teacher Education and Classical Music’s Identity Crisis

In Response to: “The Tragic Decline of Music Literacy (and Quality)”

I saw this article surface itself in music teacher circles online again recently where it should have no legs to stand on. Unfortunately, there are still 'purists' that think putting down other forms of music and ways of musicking is how their musicking and teaching methods will somehow be validated when in fact, it ends … Continue reading In Response to: “The Tragic Decline of Music Literacy (and Quality)”

The Art of By-Ear-Learning: Classical vs. Popular Styles

During our classical music degrees we were challenged with sight-singing, ear training, and transcription projects that were seemingly unrelated to the rest of our degree. "Ear Training" was a separate course and usually only done in that class—in complete isolation from everything else. Yes, our "ears" did improve with that course because it helped us … Continue reading The Art of By-Ear-Learning: Classical vs. Popular Styles

Freeing Ourselves of Music Theory and Notation: Classical vs. Popular Styles

Who says you can't play an E chord in the key of C? Bach maybe? Who decides what sounds good? Bach, perhaps again. We often forget that music theory for any genre of music comes after some famous people already figured it out themselves. Those musicians did what sounded good and a bunch of people … Continue reading Freeing Ourselves of Music Theory and Notation: Classical vs. Popular Styles